capabilities-agriculturefoodcapabilities-consumer-goodscapabilities-extractivescapabilities-financial-servicescapabilities-healthcarecapabilities-humanitarian-assistancecapabilities-manufacturingcapabilities-pharmaceuticals capabilities-public-sectorcapabilities-technology
Back

Professor Patrick Utomi - Reflections on Positive Impact

Patrick Utomi (Founder and CEO, Centre for Values in Leadership (CVL) and Chairman and CEO, Integrated Produce City (IPC)) discusses the importance of leadership in developing a culture of Positive Impact.

The Palladium Summit 2017 brought together nearly 250 delegates to explore the huge potential for Positive Impact – the intentional creation of enduring social and economic value.

What did you enjoy most about the Palladium Summit 2017?

Patrick Utomi: Well the sharing of varied experiences that the participants have brought, when you pool it, it amounts to quite a bit of understanding of what it takes to have impact. And I think that was very important.

What does Positive Impact mean to you?

PU: Positive Impact is about being a catalyst for change, for good, that impacts people across the board. Because one of the problems we’ve had – as development has taken place, as progress has taken place – is that inequality has become a significant factor. So, if we make a real impact, we can help reach the problems of inequality and create the potential for even greater growth for the world.

How can we get more companies integrating a Positive Impact approach into their corporate modus operandi?

PU: I see it moving to the fore in development planning, in the way that leaders make choices about strategies for making a difference in the world.
Really I think it’s important to show the example of the companies that are doing the right thing. The presentation from BASF, for example, is a remarkable one. I think that if other companies are made to see what their peers are doing, nothing motivates like a peer group comparison. I think that that would make a great difference in how companies choose to do things.

What do you see as the future of Positive Impact?

PU: That’s the future! A lot more focus on making that become a template for work going forward.